Sweta Srivastava Vikram

 

 

  There is something wrong with the world


When women are compelled to slaughter
their youth and become soot inside the chimney.


When the only math a girl knows
is to count the piling cadavers in her arms.


When the only science she understands
is that her womb is a pomegranate with seeds.


When the only respect she seeks
is going to bed without handprints on her face.




Trade


If my feet of teenage years crossed
the border, starvation would abandon us.
Paper, with Gandhi’s face embossed, would live


in our wallets, my father was promised by men
who had dug a tunnel of opportunity through
his weakness, termites in the holes of our walls.


An illiterate man with blindfolds
should never have been given a pen.
I couldn’t say a word as thumbprints sealed


the fate of my adult years.
Second-class citizens, mummies in tombs,
girls are where I come from.


An empty suitcase was given to me,
so I could bring back to Kathmandu flavors
of my experiences for those younger than me.


On moonless nights, stars reveal my silhouette
to hyenas who then nibble on my living flesh.
I don’t blink, fill my bag with bricks for my parents’ house.

 

                     Copyright © 2011 Sweta Srivastava Vikram

 


 
Sweta Srivastava Vikram (www.swetavikram.com) is a two times Pushcart nominated-poet, novelist, author, essayist, columnist, educator, and blogger. She is the author of three chapbooks of poetry: Because All Is Not Lost, Kaleidoscope: An Asian Journey of Colors, and Beyond the Scent of Sorrow (upcoming). She is also the co-author of two poetry collections: Whispering Woes of Ganges & Zambezi and Not All Birds Sing. Her first fiction novel, Perfectly Untraditional, will be released in 2011. Her first nonfiction book of prose and poems, Mouth full, will be published in 2012.

 

Sweta’s work has appeared in literary journals, online publications, and anthologies across United States, United Kingdom, Canada, India, New Zealand, and Philippines. Sweta was short-listed for the Unisun Poetry Prize and awarded a part scholarship for Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation in San Francisco. She has held several artist residencies in Europe and America and worked on collaborative projects with artists from Zimbabwe and Australia. Sweta is seen at poetry and prose readings across the United States, Europe, and Asia. She also teaches creative writing workshops. A graduate of Columbia University, Sweta lives in New York City. Follow her: On Twitter (@ssvik) or Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/Words.By.Sweta)